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J. Bradford DeLong
By J. Bradford DeLong - Dec 02,2014
The story goes like this: Since 1979 — the peak of the last business cycle before the inauguration of Ronald Reagan as president — economic growth in the United States has been overwhelmingly a rich-only phenomenon. Real (inflation-adjusted) wages, incomes and living
By J. Bradford DeLong - Nov 29,2014
The conclusion that America has become vastly more unequal over the past 35 years is beyond doubt. Since 1979, the pattern has been clear: the richer you were, the far richer you have become.
By J. Bradford DeLong - Oct 25,2014
For decades, people have been predicting how the rise of advanced computing and robotic technologies will affect our lives. On one side, there are warnings that robots will displace humans in the economy, destroying livelihoods, especially for low-skill workers.
By J. Bradford DeLong - Aug 16,2014
Ten years ago, the world emerged from the dot-com bust and started to look more soberly at the Internet’s potential.
By J. Bradford DeLong - Jul 20,2014
The US Federal Reserve these days is broadly happy with its monetary policy.
By J. Bradford DeLong - May 03,2014
In the online journal The Baffler, Kathleen Geier recently attempted a roundup of conservative criticism of Thomas Piketty’s new book “Capital in the Twenty-First Century”. The astonishing thing to me is how weak the right’s appraisal of Piketty’s a
By J. Bradford DeLong - Apr 23,2014
The economist Suresh Naidu once remarked to me that there were three big problems with Karl Marx’s economics.
By J. Bradford DeLong - Mar 03,2014
Reading through the just-released transcripts of the US Federal Reserve’s Federal Open Market Committee meetings in 2008, I found myself asking the same overarching question: What accounted for the FOMC’s blinkered mindset as crisis erupted all around it? To be sure,

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