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Bill Emmott
By Bill Emmott - Dec 05,2022
LONDON  —  Companies have long had to manage “key person risk”, even taking out insurance against the possibility of losing top executives through death, illness, or injury.
By Bill Emmott - Oct 15,2022
LONDON  —  When a “shock” or “extremist” election result comes with record-low voter turnout and a big yawn from financial markets, it is time to find new descriptors.
By Bill Emmott - Jul 12,2022
LONDON  —  Former Japanese Prime Minister Abe Shinzō’s assassination at an election campaign event in Nara, Japan, is both shocking and puzzling.
By Bill Emmott - Jul 11,2021
LONDON — Having been postponed from 2020 because of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Tokyo Olympic Games are approaching their opening on July 23 amid a chorus of doom.
By Bill Emmott - Jun 21,2021
LONDON — When will the world have vaccinated 80 per cent of all adults, the level presumed by scientists to produce herd immunity against COVID-19? Most people’s answer is 2023 or 2024, which suggests deep pessimism about the progress of vaccinations outside the rich world.
By Bill Emmott - Dec 29,2020
LONDON — In the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic, it was common to divide countries and their responses according to their political systems, with many attributing China’s success in controlling the virus to its authoritarianism.
By Bill Emmott - Nov 09,2020
DUBLIN — Japan’s new prime minister, Yoshihide Suga, has arrived with a suite of ambitious policy ideas, including plans to digitise government services and revive the country’s regional banks.
By Bill Emmott - Oct 07,2020
DUBLIN — Japan’s new prime minister, Yoshihide Suga, has arrived with a suite of ambitious policy ideas, including plans to digitise government services and revive the country’s regional banks.
By Bill Emmott - Aug 29,2020
DUBLIN — Shinzo Abe’s sudden resignation (on health grounds) ends the tenure of Japan’s longest-serving prime minister.
By Bill Emmott - Feb 12,2020
LONDON — Sinn Féin’s success in Ireland’s February 8 general election, where it headed the poll, has come as a shock, owing to the party’s historic ties to the Irish Republican Army (IRA) and that organisation’s association with violence.

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